Name of the organization/project in the original language: 
Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW)
Name of the organization/project in English: 
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW)
Please select the type of your organization/project: 
Research institute
Please indicate the mandate/goals/activities of your organization/project.: 
The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) is an interdisciplinary research institute dedicated to developing the scientific basis for novel approaches to wildlife conservation. In the current era of the Anthropocene, virtually all ecosystems in the world are subjected to man-made impacts. The researchers of the IZW investigate why some wildlife species are threatened by anthropogenic change, while others persist or even thrive in modified, degenerated or novel habitats. The institute integrates a variety of disciplines from the biological and veterinary sciences and conducts research on the genetic, physiological, veterinary, behavioural, ecological and evolutionary mechanisms which govern the adaptability of wildlife to global change.
How are you performing research on Citizen Science, taking part in Citizen Science activities and/or supporting Citizen Science?: 
The IZW is dedicated to initiating and supporting new CS projects. Currently the IZW conducts five CS projects: 1) "The Cheetah project in Namibia" aims to investigate cheetah biology (behaviour, genetics, physiology, population biology). Most cheetahs live on farmland, which leads to conflicts with the farmers. IZW researchers together with farmers as citizen scientists succeeded in improving the situation remarkably by investigating cheetah behaviour and being able to correctly predict their behaviour and land use. This enabled the team to provide suggestions for wildlife management strategies with benefits for farmers and cheetahs. 2) "Red foxes in Berlin" investigates potential differences between urban and rural foxes (e.g. in the behaviour, genetics, parasite load, physiology, habitat use). Another aim is the development of recommendations for wildlife management strategies. Citizen Scientists are invited to report sightings and in a next step will be actively involved in specific tasks, e.g. mapping of food sources. 3) "Hedgehogs in Berlin" investigates potential differences between urban and rural hedgehogs(e.g. in the behaviour, genetics, parasite load, physiology, habitat use). Citizen Scientists are asked to report hedgehog sightings. 4) "Wild boar in Berlin" investigates potential differences between urban and rural wild boars (e.g. in the behaviour, genetics, parasite load, physiology, habitat use). Wild boars might pose problems for citizens living in areas with relatively high densities. Here, the development of recommendations for wildlife management strategies is especially relevant. Citizen Scientists are asked to report wild boar sightings. 5) "Hyaenas in the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania". The project investigates the behavioural ecology and life history of hyaenas and Citizen Scientists are invited to contribute hyaena photographs, which allow individual identification. Additionally the IZW supports the conceptual development of Citizen Science, e.g. through the membership in GEWISS consortium. IZW has participated in the development of a CS strategy for Germany.
Name of Citizen Science Project: 
please see below
Brief description of project: 
1) "The Cheetah project in Namibia" aims to investigate cheetah biology (behaviour, genetics, physiology, population biology). Most cheetahs live on farmland, which leads to conflicts with the farmers. IZW researchers together with farmers as citizen scientists succeeded in improving the situation remarkably by investigating cheetah behaviour and being able to correctly predict their behaviour and land use. This enabled the team to provide suggestions for wildlife management strategies with benefits for farmers and cheetahs. 2) "Red foxes in Berlin" investigates potential differences between urban and rural foxes (e.g. in the behaviour, genetics, parasite load, physiology, habitat use). Another aim is the development of recommendations for wildlife management strategies. Citizen Scientists are invited to report sightings and in a next step will be actively involved in specific tasks, e.g. mapping of food sources. 3) "Hedgehogs in Berlin" investigates potential differences between urban and rural hedgehogs(e.g. in the behaviour, genetics, parasite load, physiology, habitat use). Citizen Scientists are asked to report hedgehog sightings. 4) "Wild boar in Berlin" investigates potential differences between urban and rural wild boars (e.g. in the behaviour, genetics, parasite load, physiology, habitat use). Wild boars might pose problems for citizens living in areas with relatively high densities. Here, the development of recommendations for wildlife management strategies is especially relevant. Citizen Scientists are asked to report wild boar sightings. 5) "Hyaenas in the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania". The project investigates the behavioural ecology and life history of hyaenas and Citizen Scientists are invited to contribute hyaena photographs, which allow individual identification.